Tuesday, 27 June 2017

When Were Binoculars Invented?

The History Of The Binoculars

Have you ever wondered when binoculars were invented? You would assume that they were created around the same time as the telescope, but parts of the binocular were actually being made as early as the 1200’s. The history of binoculars is not as short as you may think because, whilst the idea has been around for a long time, certain inventions needed to be made before the binoculars were able to give you properly orientated images. Read on to find out about the history of binoculars!

Lenses

Nikon Monarch 5 8x42 ReviewIn 1267 a friar called Roger Bacon wrote about his solution to the problem of focusing the eyes on close objects, i.e. the short-sightedness which tends to develop with age. He recommended that sections of glass could be placed on pages of writing to magnify their content, and by the end of the 1200’s craftsmen were already making thin glass sections which would be put into frames so people could wear them in front of their eyes, i.e. the first glasses. As these reading glasses were similar in shape to lentils, they became known as lenses because the word lens is Latin for lentil.

The Invention Of Binoculars

Binoculars were actually built in 1608 by a man called Hans Lippershey in the Netherlands. He created a convex lens and a concave lens which, when combined, could magnify the image of distant objects.

He showed his binoculars to the Assembly of the States-General of the Netherlands and they asked that he create a similar object with two lenses as it would be easier for use in battle. He did indeed create these binoculars, but they had poor resolution and bad magnification and so they didn’t become particularly popular. Lippershey wanted to patent his invention, but he was refused.

The origins of the binoculars may actually go back before Lippershey because around that time you could already buy small spyglasses with a similar design.

During the 17th/18th century, a few inventors had a go at creating smaller telescopes or two piece box telescopes, i.e. binoculars, but they were all pretty bad quality and we don’t know much about them.

Galileo

Olympus 8 x 40 DPSIGalileo may have actually stolen Lippershey’s idea because just one year later in 1609 Galileo started the process of building a telescope. He eventually created around one hundred telescopes which could magnify up to thirty times, and with these telescopes he was able to observe far away objects including the Moon, Jupiter’s satellites and his invention has lived on ever since.

Galileo’s telescopes were pretty basic by today’s standards. He only used lenses which were curved on one side and his creations have a very small field of view.

Opera Glasses

The development of binoculars doesn’t seem to have progressed very much until the 1820’s when binocular ‘theatre glasses’ started to become popular. These glasses were based on Galileo’s design, and even though the magnification wasn’t particularly powerful at all it wasn’t really a problem if the spectators only wanted to magnify a nearby stage.

Later on, in the nineteenth century similar binoculars are known as ‘field glasses’ started to be developed. These binoculars were very similar, but they have a slightly higher magnification.

Porro

Ignazio Porro is sometimes thought of as the inventor of the binocular because he received a patent in 1854 for his prism system, and without that prism system binoculars may never have become popular.

Porro prisms were created for a variety of optical instruments with the goal of orientating images so they were correct. They normally work as part of a double porto prism system which will reflect the light four times in total.

The prism is made up of right angles, and when the light enters the large rectangular face of the prism it will internally reflect twice so the image has now turned 180 degrees. There is normally a second prism rotated at 90 degrees and it is there to ensure that the light will go through both prisms.

Porro’s prism design is still widely used today. Prisms are necessary for binoculars because without them any images that you see through the binoculars will be upside down and backward! Prisms have a mirror like an effect which reflects the light back and orientates the images so they are the right way up.

Ernst Abbe & Carl Zeiss

Carl Zeiss had been working on building better microscopes since the 1840s Zeiss ran an optics workshop and in 1866 that workshop had sold over 1,000 microscopes. In 1866 he paired up with Nikon Aculon A211fellow inventor Ernst Abbe and along with Otto Schott, they worked on improving lenses for multiple optical instruments including microscopes.

Ernst Abbe is the same Abbe of the Abbe-Koenig prism. Their prism is a roof prism and it is basically designed to invert the image so it is no longer upside down. The prism is composed of two glass prisms which are cemented together in a shallow V shape.

The light will enter one side of the prism, it internally reflects 30 degrees, it is then reflected from the roof section of the binocular, and it is reflected again at 30 degrees on the opposite face of the prism. Roof prisms have been around since the late 1800s, but they only started to become popular on the market almost a hundred years ago in the 1980s.

Conclusion

The idea for the binocular is as old as Galileo, but it was only around 200 years later that the idea actually began to take off. Binoculars are very handy because you can look through them with both eyes at once which means you are not distracted by your other eye and you get a sense of depth, so it’s actually surprising they weren’t invented earlier.

Prisms are pretty much essential for binoculars because, whilst it may not matter if the moon, planet or star that you are looking at is upside down, it will probably matter if you are trying to watch live sports at a stadium or if you’re trying to take a closer look at the local (or not so local) wildlife.

Read more about When Were Binoculars Invented? on Best Binoculars.

Saturday, 3 June 2017

How Do Binoculars Work?

The Science

The refraction of light is key to how binoculars work because it explains how lenses work. Refraction is The way light bends when it goes from the air to a different material. Placing a stick in water is a refraction of light because the stick appears bent, however it is not. A lens is a curved piece of glass and when light rays hit a piece of glass such as a lens, they slow down and bend. If the lens curves, so its outside is thinner than its middle, it’s called a convex lens. As light rays enter a convex lens, they Sunagor BCF Mega Zoom Reviewbend in toward the middle—as though the lens is sucking them in. That means a convex lens brings distant light rays into a focus. It’s also called a converging lens because it makes light rays come together (converge). Looking at things through a convex lenses makes them appear bigger—so convex lenses are used in things like magnifying glasses.

A different kind of lens curves the opposite way, with the middle being thinner than the outside is. This is called a concave lens. (You can remember this easily if you think that a concave lens caves in in the middle.) A concave lens makes light rays spread out like the lines of a firework. Imagine light rays coming into a concave lens and then shooting out in all directions. That’s why a concave lens is sometimes called a diverging lens. It makes light rays shoot out (diverge). Concave lenses are used in movie projectors to make light from the film spread out and cover a bigger area when it hits the wall.

But, Binoculars?

Okay, so hopefully you can see where we’re heading. If you want to see something in the distance, you can use two convex lenses, placed one in front of the other. The first lens catches light rays from the distant object and makes a focused image a short distance behind the lens. This lens is called the objective, because it’s nearest to the object you’re looking at. The second lens picks up that image and magnifies it, just like a magnifying glass magnifies an image on paper. If you put the two lenses in a closed tube, hey presto, you have a telescope. You can make your own telescope easily enough with a couple of magnifying glasses and a cardboard tube wrapped around them.Nikon Aculon A211

Binoculars are basically just two telescopes in one device, but when light rays pass through a convex lens from a distance they cross over. Hence why far away things often look upside down when looking at them through a magnifying glass.

So binoculars have a pair of prisms (big wedges of glass) inside them to rotate the image through 180 degrees. One prism rotates the image through 90 degrees (flips it onto its side), then the next prism rotates it through another 90 degrees (flips it onto its side again), so the two prisms effectively turn it upside down. The prisms can either be arranged in a back-to-back arrangement (known as roof prisms) or at 90 degrees (known as Porro prisms)

The prisms explain why binoculars are heavy and why they are sometimes quite chunky in the middle. Field glasses, which are compact binoculars like the ones shown in the photo here, flip the incoming images using only lenses. There are no prisms, so field glasses are smaller, lighter and more compact—but the image quality is poorer.

Is this becoming any clearer?

Less Complicated Break Down

No? Okay so basically the 2 lenses you look through in a pair of Binoculars refract the light in certain ways to capture images from far away to be clearer than they really are. Like glasses lenses help you see things differently, so do Binoculars.

 

Read more about How Do Binoculars Work? on Best Binoculars.

Thursday, 14 July 2016

Best Binoculars Under £300 – Reviews Of 2015 – 2016

Top 3 Binoculars On The Market For Under £300

Product Name Features Price Point Rating Visit


Sunagor BCF Mega Zoom 30-160×70 – 24.9 x 19.8 x 7.9cm – 1.4kg – Full Zoom Lever – Case – Neck Strap – Lens Covers – Cleaning Cloth – Tripod Adaptor High End Learn More


Nikon Travelite Ex 9×25 – 10.1 x 11.6cm – 358g – Waterproof – Fog Free – Case – Neck Strap Affordable Learn More


Celestron Skymaster 20×80 – 30.5 x 17.8 x 40.6cm – 2.7kg – Tripod Adaptor – Case – Neck Strap – Lens Covers Affordable Learn More

When it comes to buying binoculars, there are more than a few options to choose from. However, if you know where to look, you can find a great option with high quality features at any price range.

Here, we will look at the top 3 binoculars under £300. Despite the low price, many of these models offer a professional level experience. Let’s see what each one is capable of.

 

Sunagor BCF Mega Zoom Review – Our Number 1

Sunagor BCF Mega Zoom ReviewAs the name might suggest, the Sunagor BCF Mega Zoom binoculars are built around offering a clear image with some very high magnification levels. Yet that isn’t all this device offers, as it actually features a robust, all-round design. It’s other unique properties include:

  • The biggest selling point here is the full range of magnification offered by these binoculars, ranging from 30 to 160 levels of magnification.
  • This is supported by a wide lens with a 70mm diameter. Perfect for letting plenty of natural light in!
  • Despite the complex magnification levels, this is all controlled by a single lever, allowing you to get the right magnification with ease.
  • Although its a standard size model, this isn’t too large, either. At 24.9 x 19.8 x 7.9 cm, this is small enough to hold with ease.
  • These binoculars also come with a padded case for extra protection and storage when not in use.
  • Likewise, the neck strap is useful for when you’re on the move and want to keep the binoculars close by.
  • Alongside this, the lens covers offer a way to protect the vulnerable part of the binoculars when not in use.
  • The tripod adaptor is also a welcome touch, for when you want to use further camera equipment with the device.

As you can see, there are a lot of practical inclusions that make this a very competitive item. While it has some great zoom qualities, the ability to scale back down to 30x means that it’s own unique features don’t become a problem when you want to view something a little closer. It’s well thought out strategies like this that make the Mega Zoom a great choice.

Summary

Features: 30-160×70 – 24.9 x 19.8 x 7.9cm – 1.4kg – Full Zoom Lever – Case – Neck Strap – Lens Covers – Cleaning Cloth – Tripod Adaptor

Pricing: High-End

Sunagor 30-160×70 BCF Mega Zoom Binoculars with Case

Price: £249.99

3.5 out of 5 stars (43 customer reviews)

2 used & new available from £249.99

 

Nikon Travelite Ex Review – Number 2

Nikon Travelite EXThe Nikon Travelite Ex is designed to offer a simple, compact option that is easy to carry, yet offers the detail and sophistication you would expect from a luxury, standard model. Let’s look at its best features.

  • With 9 levels of magnification, this can offer some great depth and the ability to pick out details across vast distances.
  • At 1000 metres, you can look at up to 91 metres of detail.
  • This great field of view is supported by a 25 mm lens diameter, which is great for a variety of environments and lighting conditions.
  • These binoculars are also waterproof for 5 minutes in depths of up to 2 metres. This is great for when you accidentally drop them in water.
  • Similarly, the internal components are designed to be fog free, ensuring you always have clear vision.
  • The kit also comes with a carrying case, making it easier to use these binoculars on the move, as well as to store.
  • Likewise, the neck strap is useful for when you want to keep your binoculars close at hand.

These are a great pair of binoculars, and the offer some fantastic features in a small, lightweight design. With extra practicality, such as the fog and waterproof features, included, this product has considered a variety of possibilities, making them useful in various situations.

Summary

Features: 9×25 – 10.1 x 11.6cm – 358g – Waterproof – Fog Free – Case – Neck Strap

Pricing: Affordable

Nikon 9X25 Travelite Ex Binoculars

Price: £103.02

4.9 out of 5 stars (19 customer reviews)

4 used & new available from £102.99

 

Celestron Skymaster Review – Number 3

Celestron Skymaster 20 X 80 BinocularsThe Celestron Skymaster binoculars offer a great level of magnification, combined with some extraordinary light conditions. Great for both day and night, these binoculars are fantastic for people who want to view vast landscapes and still pick out all the relevant details.

  • These binoculars offer a great level of depth, with 20 levels of magnification. Even long distances still offer fantastic levels of detail.
  • Similarly, the 80 mm diameter ensures great light exposure. This also makes these particular binoculars rather effective at night.
  • The device also has a built in tripod adaptor, so it can be easily fitted onto a tripod for stationary viewing experiences.
  • Despite its large lens diameter, the binoculars are smaller than you would expect, with a size of just 30.5 x 17.8 x 40.6 cm.
  • The kit also comes with a case to protect and store the item.
  • Similarly, the strap is always useful when you want to carry it on your person.
  • The lens covers offer extra protection, keeping the large lenses safe.

There are many features here, but its the large lens that will appeal to most users. Being able to use this device in a low light setting, where many other binoculars may fail, is one of the product’s biggest features.

Summary

Features: 20×80 – 30.5 x 17.8 x 40.6cm – 2.7kg – Tripod Adaptor – Case – Neck Strap – Lens Covers

Pricing: Affordable

Celestron Skymaster 20 X 80 Binoculars

Price: £99.00

4.3 out of 5 stars (645 customer reviews)

7 used & new available from £90.09

 

Verdict

From this list, it’s clear that you can get the perfect pair of binoculars for under £300, without having to sacrifice quality or efficiency. Yet, when comparing the options in more detail, it’s impossible to argue with the  Sunagor BCF Mega Zoom binoculars. This device offers so many unique features, including being able to change the zoom level, that it has earned the top position on this list.

Sunagor 30-160×70 BCF Mega Zoom Binoculars with Case

Price: £249.99

3.5 out of 5 stars (43 customer reviews)

2 used & new available from £249.99

Read more about Best Binoculars Under £300 – Reviews Of 2015 – 2016 on Best Binoculars.

Best 10×50 Binoculars – Reviews Of 2015 – 2016

Top 3 10×50 Binoculars On The Market 2016

Product Name Features Price Point Rating Visit


Nikon Prostaff 5 10×50 – 18.7 x 14 x 6.5cm – 816g – Waterproof – Fog Proof – Carrying Case – Front Lens Caps – Rear Lens Caps – Neck Strap Mid range Learn More


Hawke Endurance ED 10×50 – 794g – Waterproof – Fog Proof – Carrying Case – Neck Strap – Lens Caps – Lens Cloths Mid range Learn More


Eschenbach Arena D Plus B 10×50 – 20.3 x 8.9 x 17.8cm – 907g – Carrying Case – Strap – Waterproof – Fog Proof – Lens Caps Affordable Learn More

When it comes to getting the best binoculars, both amateurs and professionals find that 10×50 options are one of the best combinations around. At 50mm, the lens diameter ensures a vast amount of natural light and greatly improves the quality and clarity of any image as a result. Likewise, the 10 x magnification ensures great detail over vast distances.

If you’re looking for such a device to improve your own experiences, there are some fantastic options available. Let’s look at the top 3 10×50 binoculars and see what they’re capable of.

 

Nikon Prostaff 5 Review – Our Number 1

Nikon Prostaff 5 ReviewThe Nikon Prostaff 5 Binocular aims to offer a transportable device that’s easy to use but offers the high level of visual quality you would expect. Looking at its specifications, it’s easy to see how it has achieved this. It’s great features include:

  • Of course, this is a 10×50 pair of binoculars, giving you the 10 x magnification and 50mm lens diameter you would expect.
  • While it’s not the most compact, it’s dimensional size of 18.7 x 14 x 6.5cm is certainly small enough, considering the large lens and prisms involved.
  • It’s also not that heavy, weighing just 816g.
  • The device is waterproof in levels of up 1 metre, for around 10 minutes. If you drop this in water, then you don’t need to worry about damaging the device.
  • Similarly, this equipment is fog proof, so mist and other weather conditions don’t influence the quality of your viewing experience.
  • This kit also comes with a carrying case, providing an easy way to store the binoculars and all of the other components.
  • The neck strap, on the other hand, is a great way to keep the binoculars on your person for quick access.
  • This device also has both front and rear lens caps, helping to protect all the vital areas.

In short, this is a fantastic device suitable for a variety of uses. Aside from its clear visual quality, the practical features make it useful in a variety of circumstances, ensuring it is the only pair of binoculars you will need.

Summary

Features: 10×50 – 18.7 x 14 x 6.5cm – 816g – Waterproof – Fog Proof – Carrying Case – Front Lens Caps – Rear Lens Caps – Neck Strap

Pricing: Mid-Range

Nikon Prostaff 5 10×50 Binocular

Price: £194.23

4.8 out of 5 stars (6 customer reviews)

8 used & new available from £175.00

 

Hawke Endurance ED Review – Number 2

Hawke Endurance ED 10x50 BinocularThe Hawke Endurance ED Binocular model is designed to be a robust and practical option. It’s lightweight design makes carrying the equipment simple, yet it is still ergonomic and comfortable to use. Let’s look at its most unique properties.

  • Again, this is a 10×50 model, offering the high levels of light and magnification that you would expect.
  • This is one of the lighter 10×50 options around, with a weight of 794g.
  • This device is also waterproof, ensuring rain and other outdoor environments don’t damage the device.
  • It’s also fog proof, which is always useful when trying to view through fog, mist and other conditions that would otherwise cloud your image.
  • The kit comes complete with a carrying case to keep everything stored together.
  • This includes a neck strap, which is great for keeping the binoculars within quick reach and easy access.
  • Likewise, the lens caps offer an extra level of protection on the vulnerable parts of the device.
  • The lens cloth is a nice touch, offering a simple way to wipe and maintain the quality of the lens surfaces.
  • Finally, this device also comes in two different colours, letting you choose between black and green designs.

As you can see, this is a very practical device, and some great care has been taken to ensure that it offers everything you could want. Quick and easy to use, this device will feel very familiar very quickly, which is always a good sign of a quality product.

Summary

Features: 10×50 – 794g – Waterproof – Fog Proof – Carrying Case – Neck Strap – Lens Caps – Lens Cloths

Pricing: Mid-Range

Hawke Endurance ED 10×50 Binocular – Green

Price: £209.99

4.9 out of 5 stars (16 customer reviews)

4 used & new available from £209.99

Eschenbach Arena D Plus B Binoculars – Number 3

Eschenbach Arena D Plus 10x50 B BinocularsAnother standard option, the Eschenback Arena D Plus B Binoculars offers a robust design with plenty of practicality. It’s noteworthy features include:

  • This is a standard 10×50 model, offering the visual quality you would expect.
  • As a standard design, it has a reasonable size at 20.3 x 8.9 x 17.8 cm, yet this is never too big or difficult to handle thanks to the ergonomic design.
  • Similarly, at 907 g it’s not as heavy as you would expect.
  • This device is waterproof, which is essential when exploring natural environments.
  • Likewise, it is also fog proof, making it useful in a variety of natural conditions.
  • This kit comes complete with a carrying case, which is ideal for keeping everything stored away easily when not in use.
  • This includes carrying straps, which help provide a secure way of carrying the binoculars on your person.
  • It also has lens caps, which help protect the vulnerable areas and keeps dust out.

This is one of the bigger options available, but it’s great design and comfortable grip make use of the extra space. Aside from this, you get a complete kit with many practical features, such as being waterproof, that you would expect from a device of this calibre.

Summary

Features: 10×50 – 20.3 x 8.9 x 17.8cm – 907g – Carrying Case – Strap – Waterproof – Fog Proof – Lens Caps

Pricing: Affordable

Eschenbach Arena D Plus 10×50 B Binoculars

Price: £139.00

4.8 out of 5 stars (10 customer reviews)

4 used & new available from £139.00

 

Verdict

As you can see, there are some fantastic options for anyone interested in binoculars of the 10×50 variety. However, even among the very best options, few models stand out as much as the Nikon Prostaff 5 Binocular. This device offers great value for money, striving to offer a lightweight, portable design that doesn’t cut out on any of the features you would expect from luxury binoculars.

Nikon Prostaff 5 10×50 Binocular

Price: £194.23

4.8 out of 5 stars (6 customer reviews)

8 used & new available from £175.00

Read more about Best 10×50 Binoculars – Reviews Of 2015 – 2016 on Best Binoculars.

Best Binoculars For Safari – Reviews Of 2015 – 2016

Top 3 Binoculars For Safari And Wildlife 2016

Product Name Features Price Point Rating Visit


Steiner Safari Ultrasharp 10×26 10×26 – 11.6 x 4.6 x 12cm – 295g – Fast Focus Controls – Carry Case – Strap Mid range Learn More


Steiner Safari Ultrasharp 8×22 8×22 – 11 x 4.8 x 10.3cm – 227g – Fast Focus Controls – Carry Case – Strap Mid range Learn More


Olympus 8 x 40 DPSI 8×40 – Wide Angle Vision – 5.8 x 18.2 x 13.9cm – 712g – Strap Affordable Learn More

When you want to observe wildlife in its natural environment, the right pair of binoculars is crucial. Whether its birdwatching or participating in a safari, the need to maintain distance, yet still obtain a good view, makes binoculars valuable.

Binoculars, as a whole, can be used for various means, yet there are a number of options tailored for use on safari or for viewing wildlife in general. Here are 3 of the best products currently available.

 

Steiner Safari Ultrasharp 10×26 Review – Our Number 1

Steiner Safari Ultrasharp 10 x 26 BinocularsThese Steiner Safari Ultrasharp Binoculars are a great, compact pair of binoculars that have plenty of practical uses, proving especially useful when observing wildlife. Let’s take a look at its more unique properties:

  • With a 26mm diameter, these wide lenses let in plenty of light, which is ideal for making the most of natural environments.
  • As far as zoom is concerned, these binoculars have 10 levels of magnification. This is pretty deep level of magnification, making this binoculars great for observing from a distance.
  • The fast focus controls are a welcome touch. You just need to use one dial in the middle of the binoculars to adjust.
  • The binoculars also come with a carry case, letting you store them safely when not in active use.
  • Likewise, the strap is a welcome feature. When you’re close to nature, having them around your neck is makes them much easier to grab and use, rather than having to use the carry case.
  • As far as size goes, this is a rather light and compact model, despite its wide lens diameter. At just 11.6 x 4.6 x 12cm, there are no problems carrying these around.
  • They’re also rather light, too, at just 295g for the actual binoculars.

Despite their small size, these devices offer plenty of depth, which is great for observing even smaller animals (such as birds) at a distance. Supported by fast focus features and a broad lens, these are the kind of binoculars you want within easy reach when outside.

Summary

Features: 10×26 – 11.6 x 4.6 x 12cm – 295g – Fast Focus Controls – Carry Case – Strap

Pricing: Mid-Range

Steiner Safari Ultrasharp 10 x 26 Binoculars

Price: £90.01

4.6 out of 5 stars (85 customer reviews)

10 used & new available from £89.99

 

Steiner Safari Ultrasharp 8×22 Review – Number 2

Steiner Safari Ultrasharp 8x22These Steiner Safari Ultrasharp Binoculars are similar to the previous model, this time using an 8×22 model. Despite their smaller size, this product still has a lot to offer. It’s noteworthy features include:

  • The 22mm diameter offers a decent amount of light, aided by high contrast optics to ensure a clear image.
  • This is supported with 8 levels of magnification. This ensures great visibility over long distances and the ability to pick out details across this range.
  • Fast focus controls are also available here, offering a quick dial to adjust the focus.
  • As far as storage goes, these binoculars also come with their own carry case, which is always useful.
  • The strap, similarly, has its uses and certainly proves useful when watching wildlife.
  • Thanks to its smaller diameter, this is a very slim model. It’s dimensional size is just 11 x 4.8 x 10.3cm, so you’ll have no problem carrying it around.
  • Of course, it also weighs very little. On its own, it is just 227g.

One of the big benefits of this model is that it is even smaller. This is great for fitting in your pockets, giving you a great pair of binoculars that don’t slow you down when walking from place to place.

Summary

Features: 8×22 – 11 x 4.8 x 10.3cm  – 227g – Fast Focus Controls – Carry Case – Strap

Pricing: Mid-Range

Steiner Safari UltraSharp 8 x 22 Binoculars

Price: £79.00

4.6 out of 5 stars (85 customer reviews)

14 used & new available from £68.01

 

Olympus 8 x 40 DPSI Review – Number 3

Olympus 8 x 40 DPSI BinocularA standard model, the Olympus DPSI Binocular product offers a wide lens and a great, ergonomic design. Here’s what else this option has to provide you:

  • With a 40mm diameter, the lenses on these binoculars let in great amounts of light, offering clear, vibrant images.
  • Similarly, with 8 levels of magnification, this device offers great viewing distances, maintaining a clear focus.
  • The wide-angle view field is also appreciated. This allows you to keep a greater range of view within your scope. Perfect for sudden movements!
  • On this model, the angle of view is an impressive 65.6° – at 1000 m distance, you can effectively take-in 143m in one viewing!
  • The lenses also come with anti-reflective properties, helping to prevent the sun from disturbing your view.
  • A strap is also included, giving you an easy way to keep the items close at hand.
  • Despite being a standard size binocular model, this item is still reasonably small at just 5.8 x 18.2 x 13.9cm.
  • It’s also not that heavy, either, weighing in at 712g.

Despite being larger, the vision capabilities of these binoculars will make them popular with many people. With great depth and a great width of vision, this is a fantastic option for people who want to stay in one spot and take all of the wilderness in.

Summary

Features: 8×40 – Wide Angle Vision – 5.8 x 18.2 x 13.9cm – 712g – Strap

Pricing: Affordable

Olympus 8 x 40 DPSI Binocular

Price: £38.00

4.8 out of 5 stars (788 customer reviews)

16 used & new available from £38.00

 

Verdict

Clearly, there are some truly fantastic binoculars available right now. However, after looking at the very best options, the number one position on this list clearly belongs to the Steiner Safari Ultrasharp 10×26 Binoculars. This device has a high level of magnification, a wide lens diameter for light and, somehow, still offers a compact design that adds to the practicality. When you’re watching nature on the go, you need something portable and easy to use, which is exactly what the Steiner Safari Ultrasharp provides.

Steiner Safari Ultrasharp 10 x 26 Binoculars

Price: £90.01

4.6 out of 5 stars (85 customer reviews)

10 used & new available from £89.99

Read more about Best Binoculars For Safari – Reviews Of 2015 – 2016 on Best Binoculars.

Best 10×42 Binoculars – Reviews Of 2015 – 2016

Top 3 10×42 Binoculars 2016

Product Name Features Price Point Rating Visit


Nikon Monarch 5 10×42 – 14.5 x 12.9 x 4.2cm – 599g – Waterproof – Fog Proof – Neck Strap – Lens Cap – Carrying Case High End Learn More


Bushnell Legend Ultra HD 10×42 – 13.4 x 10.2 x 17.5cm – 699g – Waterproof – Fog Proof – Carrying Case – Neck Strap – Lens Cloth – Harness High End Learn More


Celestron Outland 10×42 – 17.8 x 7.6 x 20.3cm – 907g – Neoprene Carrying Case – Tripod Adapter Threads – Neck Strap – Lens Caps – Lens Cloth Affordable Learn More

When it comes to binoculars, many people have their favourite preferences. For many, 10×42 options are ideal. The 10 levels of magnification offers a great amount of detail, even from far distances, while the 42 mm lens diameter ensures plenty of light, even in dark environments.

Fortunately, the binocular market is quite broad and there are a good range of 10×42 options available. Let’s take a look at the top 3 options and see what they’re capable of.

 

Nikon Monarch 5 Review – Our Number 1

Nikon Monarch 5 ReviewThe Nikon Monarch 5 is a lightweight, compact binocular device that focuses on ensuring a clear image in a variety of conditions and environments. It has a number of other practical features, including:

  • This is, of course, a 10×42 binocular device, so it has the zoom and wide lens that you want.
  • Likewise, it fits this into a reasonable small package. The binoculars have a size of just 14.5 x 12.9 x 4.2 cm, which helps keep them portable.
  • As far as weight goes, they weight just under 600g, which keeps them light enough.
  • The waterproof feature adds extra security. Not only are these binoculars great for viewing in the rain, they also survive any contact with water that might accidentally occur.
  • Similarly, the fog free feature ensures mist and sudden changes in weather don’t disrupt your viewing experience or quality.
  • The kit comes with a neck strap, which is great for when you need to keep your binoculars within quick and easy access.
  • The carrying case also makes them easy to both carry and store when not in use.
  • The lens caps help protect the vulnerable parts of the device, offering some appreciated safety.

As you can see, this is a very practical option, offering a lightweight design with some fantastic, clear lens capabilities.

Summary

Features: 10×42 – 14.5 x 12.9 x 4.2cm – 599g – Waterproof – Fog Proof – Neck Strap – Lens Cap – Carrying Case

Pricing: High-End

Nikon Monarch 5 10×42 Binoculars

Price: £260.96

4.8 out of 5 stars (36 customer reviews)

12 used & new available from £235.10

 

Bushnell Legend Ultra HD Review – Number 2

Bushnell 191042 Legend Ultra HDA similarly compact model, the Bushnell Legend Ultra HD focuses on providing clear visuals and a design that is easy to use and become familiar with. Let’s take a look at what else it has to offer.

  • Again, this is a 10×42 model, so you know you’re getting a clear, crisp image.
  • This is still also a rather small model at 13.4 x 10.2 x 17.5cm.
  • It’s also quite light at 699g, so carrying this device around is rather effortless and easy.
  • This device also comes with a rainguard, to protect the lens during the rain, as well as general waterproof features to keep the entire device safe from water.
  • Likewise, the fog proof features make this device useful in fog, mist and various other weather conditions you might encounter.
  • This kit comes with a lens cloth for added practicality, helping to easily clean the lens when you need to.
  • The carrying case also provides an easy way to store everything, including the binoculars, when needed.
  • The neck strap and harness provide an easy way to carry the binoculars on your person, keeping them within easy reach.

This device is very practical and the numerous additional inclusions only go to prove that. As for the binoculars themselves, the design is lightweight and the device is always easy to use and see through.

Summary

Features: 10×42 – 13.4 x 10.2 x 17.5cm – 699g – Waterproof – Fog Proof – Carrying Case – Neck Strap – Lens Cloth – Harness

Pricing: High-End

Nikon Monarch 5 10×42 Binoculars

Price: £260.96

4.8 out of 5 stars (36 customer reviews)

12 used & new available from £235.10

 

Celestron Outland Review – Number 3

Celestron 71347 OutlandA standard size option, the Celestron Outland Roof Prism Binocular will prove popular with various wildlife hobbyists and birdwatchers, thanks to its various features designed to improve the outdoor experience. This includes:

  • Again, this is a 10×42 model but, being a standard build, it’s a little bigger than most at 17.8 x 7.6 x 20.3 cm.
  • As a standard build, this device is a little bigger but it often fits easier into larger hands than smaller options.
  • For extra versatility, these binoculars have built-in adapter threads for tripods, allowing you easily fit the device to a tripod for a more stationary viewing experience.
  • The kit itself all comes in a neoprene case, helping to make the device much more transportable.
  • This kit includes lens caps to help protect the vital lens.
  • Similarly, the cleaning cloth gives you a quick way to wipe the lens and keep your image clear.
  • The neck strap is an added touch and allows you to carry the device around personally, which is great for when you’re on the move.

While it is a little bigger, this device makes use of the extra space, offering more grip and the ability to adapt to a tripod. This is certainly useful for many hobbyists, making this device worthy of your consideration.

Summary

Features: 10×42 – 17.8 x 7.6 x 20.3cm – 907g – Neoprene Carrying Case – Tripod Adapter Threads – Neck Strap – Lens Caps – Lens Cloth

Pricing: Affordable

Nikon Monarch 5 10×42 Binoculars

Price: £260.96

4.8 out of 5 stars (36 customer reviews)

12 used & new available from £235.10

 

Verdict

Ultimately, there are some great 10×42 binocular options at any budget. However, after looking at the best 3 options, it’s clear that the  Nikon Monarch 5 stands out from the rest. Thanks to its overall practical design, as well as its clear image and lens capabilities, this device offers a level of quality that is hard to argue with.

Nikon Monarch 5 10×42 Binoculars

Price: £260.96

4.8 out of 5 stars (36 customer reviews)

12 used & new available from £235.10

Read more about Best 10×42 Binoculars – Reviews Of 2015 – 2016 on Best Binoculars.